Where are the Parents?

It’s a huge responsibility teaching the youth, and one that I don’t take lightly. I spend a lot of my own time and money on the classroom. I choose to do that. I try my best to reach every student in a meaningful and positive way. However, I can’t do this job on my own.

Think of education as a three legged stool. Each leg is a vital component of the stool. If any leg failed to do their job and did not cooperate together, the stool would fall down and it would be useless. A tripod cannot stand with one leg alone.

The three legs are, in no particular order are; the teacher, the student, and the home. The teacher is responsible for educating the student at school, for making sure that the student understands the work, and does his or her best. The student has the very important job of learning and trying his or her best. If the student refuses to learn, the stool falls down and the teacher can do nothing to restore the balance.

The final component, and the one most often overlooked, is the home. Students need a supportive atmosphere at home. The parents need to be involved. I know my parents were involved in my education. They made sure that I did my homework. If the school called because of any bad behaviour, I was punished at home for it. My parents supported my teachers, they made sure I had books at home, they read to me, and did countless other things that I probably am not even completely aware of. I want them to know that I appreciate it.

As a teacher I get discouraged when I see that the lack of parental involvement in any of my students’ lives. It is sad. And unfortunately it seems that a majority of parents rely completely on the schools to educate their children. They blame teachers and don’t realize that they are equally to blame. I don’t know why but the parents that seem to be concerned about their child’s education are few and far between. My question is, where are the parents?

5 Comments on Where are the Parents?

  1. Man, do I EVER agree with you on this one!!!

    I work in a district where 99 percent of our problem is the parents. The only way we can ever get them out to any school event is to provide free food and lots of it.

    And I was so annoyed last week when the troubled youngster that I work with had a chance to go to a basketball clinic where he would also have learned about the importance of focusing in school — something so important that I personally wrote his mother a letter spelling out the details, reminding her that it was free, and offering to work out transportation for him if it was a problem.

    Did she respond? Nope. Not at all.

  2. It’s a sad commentary indeed. I have seen it in every school I have worked at, whether as a teacher or an after-school supervisor. In always pains my heart a little.

  3. I so admire your profession!
    My sister is a teacher and so I know How Hard You All work!
    Hang in there please.

    There is a big problem for some time in this country which affects every sphere of endeavor….It is one face of the problems you encounter in your profession. It is encountered throughout society.
    It is the lack of personal responsibility.

    We no longer as a society and a culture exalt this as we should.

    (I am so afraid that in a comment to a teacher, I am going to misspell a word)

  4. Maybe the parents are so wrapped up in their lives that they are forgeting their children. Or are finally happy that the kids are old enough to go to school, so they can have time to themselves. I don’t think any one demographic is to blame, because you can see this type of negelct in even the most affluent communities.

    Maybe the parents aren’t speaking the same language as you, metaphorically speaking. Aren’t as concerned as you are about their children’s future.

  5. that’s an interesting way to picture how teaching is i never thought about it that way with the stool i’ll have to remember that!!

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