Category Archives: reads

Celebrating books and the written word. Featuring book reviews and more.

Invincible or Infamous Iron Man?

Invincible Iron Man – Vol 1: Reboot

Tony Stark has new armor and it is truly remarkable. There is a stealth mode, it can change colour, and it is incredible easy to get in and out of. Unfortunately Pepper Potts is not at Stark Industries anymore and Tony doesn’t have anyone to rely on to run the business.

Invincible Iron Man – Vol 2: The War Machines

Mary Jane tried to get away from super-heroes. She moved to a city where she thought she’d just could open up a night club and live a normal live. But fate had different plans for her.  A demon invaded her venue and it took Iron Man, Doctor Strange, and Victor Von Doom to stop it. That’s right, Doctor Doom. He seems to want to help, but Tony doesn’t trust him at all.

With Mary Jane’s club destroyed, she reluctantly starts to work for Tony, and he is very lucky to have her on the team.

Invincible Iron Man – Vol 3: Civil War II

The second super-hero Civil War is a major crossover event that spans almost all of the Marvel monthly titles. The main story was quite well done, but there are pieces of the story missing if you only read that and then jump into this series.

I wish the book editor had put a few notes in this story to fill in some of the knowledge gaps I had. This volume pretty much assumes you know what is happening in the MCU (Marvel Comics Universe) and I didn’t.

That being said, having read the Civil War trade paperback and the Miles Morales Spider-man arc, I pretty much knew what was happening (for the most part).

I was really surprised to see this series come to an end as well. It will be continued in the next volume of the title and start again with Issue #1. I don’t see why either. This could have continued in an on-going series instead of a limited run volume.

Infamous Iron Man – Vol 1: Infamous

When Tony Stark went undercover and let the world believe he was dead, Victor Von Doom decided to step up and become the new Iron Man. In the three graphic novels above, we can see that he had been trying to turn over a new leaf. But it is hard to trust that he is not up to his old Dr. Doom ways.

Ben Grim aka The Thing of the now defunct Fantastic Four certainly doesn’t trust him and will do whatever it takes to bring him to justice.

I was hoping this title might have been as good as Superior Spider-man when Peter Parker’s arch enemy, Doc Ock took the mantle and was determined to be the best Spider-man yet. It’s not quite as good, but it does have some potential. I am curious to see where this title goes next.

It’s nice to see Bendis and Maleev working together again. Their iconic run on Daredevil is still one of my favourites.

My List of 2017 Reads – my annual reading log (continually updated)

Digital Daredevil

Let’s get caught up on some Daredevil reading, shall we?

Daredevil / Punisher – Seventh Circle

The Punisher is trying to exact his own form of justice on a criminal who is set to stand trial in Texas. Daredevil would rather let the legal system decide his fate, however. So, he tries his best to get the mob boss there and prevent Frank Castle from murdering him on route. Of course, if the mob boss really is guilty, then he would likely be subject to capital punishment. Either way, this man is as good as dead and the Punisher would rather make sure it happens than wait for the court.

Daredevil – Road Warrior

This digital comic brings Daredevil to life in a way that a regular comic cannot. I read it on the Marvel Unlimited app which allows you to tap the screen to advance to the next panel. The artists made great use of this feature by overlapping elements, showing motion between frames, and illustrating what Daredevil sees through his enhanced senses. The story involves his beating a Man Bull and then pursuing a man who has no heartbeat. It’s a four issue series that was very well done and a great read.

Daredevil – Dark Nights

Matt Murdock battles an intense snowstorm that plays havoc with his senses. Petty criminals take advantage of the blind man in a storm and rob him. Injured, he ends up in the hospital and learns about a little girl who needs a heart transplant. When the helicopter crashes, he takes it upon himself to go back out into the cold to retrieve it and save her life.

The second story features Misty Knight, who you might be familiar with from the Luke Cage television show. She has a bionic arm for some reason in this one. But her and Daredevil make a great team.

Daredevil / Deadpool – Annual Vol 1

This story wasn’t really anything special. I’m not a big fan of Deadpool in the comics. I enjoyed the film version, but very comic I’ve read by him so far has fallen kind of flat. This one is no exception. Typhoid Mary is the villain in this one. If you enjoyed her in the regular series, you might like this follow up.

My List of 2017 Reads – comics, novels, and more

Hip-Hop Formed in Clay in an Amazing Way

What is Hip-Hop? by Eric Morse and Anny Yi

This book is incredible for so many reasons. It celebrates hip-hop in a way that shows respect for the art and culture. It not only pays tribute to some of the pioneers of the art form, but it does so in a way that is quite entertaining to both young and old.

Eric Morse breaks down the history of hip-hop by recapping some of the artists and innovations we have seen over the past forty years.

In the beginning,
there was a beat
Two records spinning,
and the crowd got on its feet.

It might be hard to believe but that is the essence of hip-hop right there. It started with the DJ and the goal was to simply get people to dance. It moved to huge heights after that simple start and it’s nice to see that we are at a point in time where we can look back and celebrate those humble beginnings and see where we’ve come.

Anny Yi’s art really put a smile on my face. She beautifully captures the essence of hip-hop in her sculpted clay-art dioramas.

I love this spread. LL Cool J is dressed in his old school gear with the iconic radio from his album of the same name on the ground beside him. The background brings to life the visuals we saw from one of his biggest hits, “Mama Said Knock You Out.” The mama is question, his grandma, is even in the scene.

Of course, we have over forty years of history to cover and a typical picture book can only begin to scratch the surface. But some of the stories and legends that don’t get told are represented in the inside cover.

If I was reading this to children, I would tell them stories about Rick Rubin’s brilliant production and how it captured the true sound of hip-hop as heard on the stage. I would tell them about the business savvy of Russell Simmons, and how MC Lyte and Lauryn Hill can rock the mic like no one else.

My only criticism of the book has to do the rhyme scheme. I mentioned this in the last picture book I reviewed. It’s okay for a picture book to not rhyme every single line. Also, this is a book about hip-hop, so I think the rhymes should reflect what is heard on stage and in the records. So the A-B-A-B rhyme scheme that starts off the book seems wrong. Thankfully, it did move into the more familiar A-A-B-B rhyme scheme quickly.

There is one small error in the book, the author seemed to attribute a Queen Latifah song to Krs-One. I understand the sentiment. They both preached unity, but only one of them spelled it U.N.I.T.Y.

It ends with a prediction of the future that remains true to the past.

By now the culture’s spread
to every corner of the globe
. . .
But hip-hop remains, deep down at its heart
a unique expression, and urban form of art.

Make sure you pick up a copy of What is Hip-Hop?

when it drops on September 5th

It will be available wherever you buy books.

My List of 2017 Reads – novels, comics, memoirs, and more.

Sonya Sahni and the First Grade

Sonya Sahni and the First Grade: Its International Day! by Soma Mandal and Tim Williams

Having a foot in two different worlds can be difficult for anyone. Even more so for a kid trying to figure out how to fit in with her friends at school and please her parents at home. Sonya tries her best  to do just that in this bright, colourful picture book.

Sonya doesn’t like that her parents push her Indian culture on her. She wants to assimilate into American life and not have to worry about traditional clothes and food that looks and smells different from her peers.

She doesn’t understand that it’s important to acknowledge who she is. She doesn’t have to give up her heritage to fit in at all. To help her see this, her teacher decides to celebrate all of the cultures in the class on International Day. The students fly two flags that day. Sonya sports an Indian flag in one hand and an American one in the other. Her fellow students do the same thing with flags of their ancestry.

The teacher worked with parents to make sure different foods were available for everyone to try. Sonya saw all sorts of different foods that didn’t look like the regular lunches her fellow classmates bought or brought. She started to appreciate the differences and embrace her own heritage.

It is very important for children in our classes to see themselves reflected in the texts we have available. That is why I will be proud to add this to my classroom library.

One criticism I have of this book is that the entire story is written in rhyme. There are times where this seems forced. This story could have been told without the consistent end rhyme. It might have even been more powerful that way.

My List of 2017 Reads – continually updated with every new book I read this year

Teaching Tip Archive – over 200 great tips, tricks, lessons, and inspiration from my classroom to yours.

Superhero Novels (For Eyes and Ears)

Wonder Woman: Mythos by Carol Lay

A couple go scuba diving on their honeymoon in the Bermuda triangle and the man disappears. Wonder Woman investigates and finds that there is a mysterious island that mirrors the one she is from. This one is entirely populated by men and they seem to be under some form of control. Could the God of War, Ares, be behind it? Is the prophecy Diana heard about as a kid coming true?

I am a big fan of audio books. It is a great way to experience a story when you are on the go. This one even has full cast narration. And even better it has the same voice actors from the last Justice League title I borrowed from the library.

Iron Man: The Gauntlet by Eoin Colfer

Eoin Colfer is a great writer. I absolutely loved the Artemis Fowl series. He also did a great job writing in Douglas Adams’ voice for a bonus sixth installment of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. That is why I knew his take on this superhero would be worth the read.

I don’t want to give away too much of the plot here. I knew nothing about the story going into it and that was a good thing. All I will say is that a teenage girl gives Tony Stark a run for his money in this one. If you are familiar with what is happening in the Marvel comics stories now, don’t worry, this is a completely fresh take on the hero, not related to that continuity, and a completely different girl. Yet it is equally entertaining.

I love how Colfer flips some common conventions of comics and storytelling. You can see he had fun penning this one.

My List of 2017 Reads – an annual reading log, continually updated

The Second Super-Hero Civil War

Civil War II

In the first super-hero civil war, Iron-Man and Captain America couldn’t see eye to eye. The stakes were high and there was no way around it. A clear line was drawn and it left people on opposing sides with no other choice but to fight.

Tony Stark, aka  Iron Man, was hoping that nothing would divide the super-hero community like that again. But a new inhuman with the power to see the future now upsets the balance. Captain Marvel wants to use him to prevent disasters from happening. Stark sees it as profiling and believes it is a wrong. Plus, can the visions even be trusted.

This was a good read that had tie-ins to almost all of the current Marvel titles. The new Spider-Man has a pivot role in this conflict as well. Also, Ms Marvel (one of my new-favourite heroes) and Old-Man Logan make appearances.

My List of 2017 Reads – an on-going and continually updated reading log

Why You Should Tell Your Story

The Story You Need to Tell by Sandra Marinella, MA, MEd

“Our words create us. Our stories create us. And our writing can re-create us.”

Wise words from Sandra Marinella, a writer who has taught several people how to use personal writing to come to terms with, overcome, and learn from past traumas. And now through the power of this book, she can teach all of us. Every chapter ends with a few writing prompts and exercises that can help us to use personal writing to heal.

She reveals the five stages of writing . . .

  1. Experience your pain and grief
  2. Break your silence and find your voice.
  3. Accept and piece together a difficult or broken story.
  4. Find meaning and make sense of this event or story.
  5. Rewrite your story and find ways to reconnect with your well-being.

and hopes that the “book will give you the following gifts – the power to find your voice, the ability to transform your story when needed, and the well-being that comes from renewed meaning, resilience, and creative living.”

Marinella explains the deep power of story and how the act of reading can help us live our day to day lives. She mentions Keith Oatley’s brilliant metaphor comparing stories to flight simulators. Just as pilots can use flight simulators to train for all sorts of scenarios , we can use stories to help us get through life experiences. We learn from a character’s response to a situation and can then use that knowledge to help us get through a similar time.

Creating our own self-stories is a powerful experience. The writing process allows us to make sense of what has happened to us and to move forward. Marinella puts it this way, “Our brains allow us not only to create our personal story of self, but to edit, interpret, and find meaning in what we are creating.”

So, pick up a pen or open up your word processor and start writing about your life. You have a story you need to tell.

My List of 2017 Reads – updated regularly with every new title I read this year

Darth Vader Ends It

Darth Vader – The Shu-Torun War

These comic stories take place after the events depicted in Episode IV: A New Hope, but before any of the sequel films. It’s really nice to see Darth Vader trying to figure out who he is and how he fits into the Galactic Empire. He needs to redeem himself in the eyes of the Emperor after the destruction of the Death Star.

In this story, Darth Vader goes to a planet to squash a revolt against the empire. And things get messy.

Darth Vader – End of Games

The cover art for the fourth volume of the on-going Darth Vader series is simply brilliant. I love how the Death Star morphs into his helmet. It shows that he, himself, is a powerful weapon and is still under construction.

I can’t get into the story of this one much without giving away any spoilers. I will say that the title has a ring of finality to it. Perhaps Vader is through playing games. Maybe he is coming into his own and figuring out his destiny as the apprentice of the Dark Side of The Force.

This series is very well done and much better than any of the recent films. I wish comic writers would work on the films. This is a story that would work well. Forget Rogue One, or the new trilogy. This is the story die-hard fans can get behind.

My List of 2017 Reads – my continually updated reading log

Max & Charlie Figuring It All Out

Max & Charlie book

Max & Charlie by Zack Lieberman and Louis Neubert

This was a great read. From the very first page, the artwork captures the imagination of the main characters. It is bright and colourful and stylistically stunning.

The opening daydream shows a young boy pretending to be a space-warrior. His dog, a trusty companion in a mission to save the universe. They make a good team, but you can see that the dog isn’t impressed with all of the imaginary play. He just wants to get outside.

When they do go outside, Max pulls on the leash and basically drags Charlie through the streets and parks on New York City. Charlie, seeing that other dogs are fine off of the leash, decides that Max might be as well. But the second he unclicks the lead, Max takes off. Charlie spends the rest of the book chasing him.

The two main characters discover all sorts of interesting things about the city. Charlie meets a variety of characters who all share their philosophy of life and the universe with him. Themes of cooperation, the beauty that surrounds us, and finding your purpose abound in the work.

It’s one of the stories that when you finally get to the last page and close the book, you have a smile on your face.

For Charlie, the journey might have been long and annoying. It started with a simple mistake that had unforeseen consequences. It wore him down and tired him out. But, in the end, he learned something. It was worth it. The journey showed him something he needed to see and he is now richer for it.

Perhaps that is what life is like for us all. It’s about the journey and what we learn along the way.

My List of 2017 Reads – my detailed annual reading log

 

The Flash – Stop Motion

The Flash – Stop Motion (Justice League)

Wally West is the fastest man alive.  If you are a fan of the television show, this version of The Flash is a little bit different. In this incarnation, West, is the only Flash. His uncle, Barry Allen, passed away a few years back.

I was really surprised at all of the violence in this story. The villain kills several people but the descriptions of the killings and the sound effects in this audio book make it all the more creepy.

It turns out that the villain is a speedster who can travel faster than the speed of light. Even worse, this monstrosity was created in a lab and he simple cannot be controlled or stopped. It’s up to West to save the day, with a little help from the Martian Manhunter, Super-man, Green Lantern, and Plastic Man, and Wonder-Woman.

This Graphic Audio presentation features full cast narration and sound effects. The series describes itself as a “movie in your mind.” I think all books have that power. I am a big fan of audio books and find that they don’t really need to be dressed up so much. It’s almost as if they were trying too hard to make this different and, pardon the pun, flashy.

I like how the story dealt with the speed force. It was a different take on it from what we have seen in the television series. I also like how they tried to tackle the science behind it. It might not always work, but I was able to get lost in the story and enjoy a good super hero tale. This book is also available as a prose novel if you would rather read than listen.

My List of 2017 Reads – my ongoing reading log for the year